Dr. Katharina Ruthsatz

I am a biologist interested in (amphibian) physiology, endocrinology, and conservation. In particular, I investigate how global change might affect amphibian development, energy budgets, and survival. I am interested in how amphibians might cope with novel environments and challenges by exhibiting phenotypic plasticity.

In my research, I make use of various tools associated with conservation physiology such as measuring heart and metabolic rate, thermal tolerance and performance, acclimation capacity, body condition, and stress hormones. I am especially interested in endocrine disruptive effects of environmental stressors such as temperature variation and pollution. Thus, helping stressed amphibians is my mission.

In addition to my research, I am passionate about teaching students in the field of anatomy, physiology, ecology, and biostatistics at university. Proper academic education and supervision of students play an important role in my professional self-concept.
I did my PhD in the Dausmann Lab (Functional Ecology - Ecology & Energetics) at the University of Hamburg in Germany. After finishing my PhD, I was a PostDoc in the Ganzhorn Lab (Animal Ecology and Conservation) at the same place.

Currently, I am an assistant professor in the Vences Lab (Evolutionary Biology) at the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. I am establishing my own working group Conservation Physiology and Ecotoxicology.

Being a biologist is more than just a job for me. I share my personal interests in and my knowledge of biological phenomena together with my research on my science blog. In my free time, I love to go hiking, running, or biking. But one can also find me drawing or walking my adopted dog Stina.

Dr. Katharina Ruthsatz

I am a biologist interested in (amphibian) physiology, endocrinology, and conservation. In particular, I investigate how global change might affect amphibian development, energy budgets, and survival. I am interested in how amphibians might cope with novel environments and challenges by exhibiting phenotypic plasticity.

In my research, I make use of various tools associated with conservation physiology such as measuring heart and metabolic rate, thermal tolerance and performance, acclimation capacity, body condition, and stress hormones. I am especially interested in endocrine disruptive effects of environmental stressors such as temperature variation and pollution. Thus, helping stressed amphibians is my mission.

In addition to my research, I am passionate about teaching students in the field of anatomy, physiology, ecology, and biostatistics at university. Proper academic education and supervision of students play an important role in my professional self-concept.

I did my PhD in the Dausmann Lab (Functional Ecology - Ecology & Energetics) at the University of Hamburg in Germany. After finishing my PhD, I was a PostDoc in the Ganzhorn Lab (Animal Ecology and Conservation) at the same place.

Currently, I am an assistant professor in the Vences Lab (Evolutionary Biology) at the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. I am establishing my own working group Conservation Physiology and Ecotoxicology.

Being a biologist is more than just a job for me. I share my personal interests in and my knowledge of biological phenomena together with my research on my science blog. In my free time, I love to go hiking, running, or biking. But one can also find me drawing or walking my adopted dog Stina.

Curriculum Vitae



Date & place of birth:
02. September 1989 in Itzehoe, Germany

Nationality:
German

07/2020 - ongoing

Technical University of Braunschweig, Evolutionary Biology, Assistant Professor

10/2019 - 02/2020

Technical University of Braunschweig, Lectureship

04/2019 -06/2019

University of Hamburg/ Centrum für Naturkunde (CeNak), Lectureship

01/2019 – 06/2020

University of Hamburg; Animal Ecology and Conservation, Post-doctoral Research Associate

10/2015 - 09/2018

University of Hamburg; Ecology & Energetics, Doctoral Research Associate

10/2012 - 07/2015

University of Hamburg; Department of Biology, Research Assistant

01/2015 – 12/2018

University of Hamburg. Doctoral Studies at the Department of Biology. Degree: Dr. rer. nat. Biology. Thesis (cumulative): Amphibians in a Changing World: an Ecophysiological Perspective on Amphibian Metamorphosis (1.0; magna cum laude).

10/2012 - 12/2014

University of Hamburg. Course of Study: Biology, German Philology (teacher training). Degree: Master of Education (1.45). Thesis: Food Quality Induces Plasticity in Intestinal Morphology of Tadpoles (1.0).

10/2009 - 10/2012

University of Hamburg. Course of Study: Biology, German Philology (teacher training). Degree: Bachelor of Science (1.62). Thesis: The Biology of Monotremes (1.0).

06/2019

PostDoc1st Award. Advancement award of the Department of Biology (University of Hamburg) for an excellent doctoral thesis.

Languages

German, native speaker
English, academic fluent written and spoken

Driver’s license

European Type A and B

Scholarships and Grants



03/2021

German Research Foundation (DFG) Research Grants Programme Individual Proposal, New Proposal/Establishment Proposal

04/2020

German academic exchange service (DAAD)
6 month short-term fellowship for postdoctoral researchers

09/2017

Reisekostenzuschuss aus dem Körperschaftsvermögen
der Universität Hamburg

09/2015

Reisekostenzuschuss aus dem Körperschaftsvermögen
der Universität Hamburg